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Dublin: New Blog For Citizen’s Free Press Ireland.com

11 Oct

FOLLOW THIS LINK FOR FUTURE POSTS:

http://www.citizensfreepressireland.com/

Current Photo Albums at:

http://picasaweb.google.com/106601042721625135361

Follow J. P. on facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/greagues2 &

http://twitter.com/freepressdublin 

Link to photo Archive:

https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=7d84d8d85790ac27

 
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London: Beat The Burglars and Say Safe At Home:

10 Oct

Barely a day goes past without another news headline proclaiming someone viciously attacked, robbed or worse in their own home.

The past year has seen domestic burglaries rise 14 per cent, while recent figures for England and Wales revealed a householder is attacked by a violent burglar every 30 minutes.

But the crime statistics needn’t make you feel like a victim-in-waiting in your own front room. 

 There are some easy steps you can take to make your house a safer place to be. 

To mark this year’s National Personal Safety Day (October 10) the Suzy Lamplugh Trust – set up following the disappearance of the 25-year-old estate agent in 1986 – has launched a campaign to get more people taking simple safety precautions.

So what can you do to minimize the risks at home?

Protect against bogus callers

Install a door chain and outside lighting – and never answer the door before you’ve checked through a spy-hole or window if you know the caller. If not, put the chain on before opening the door and ask for ID.

Don’t be rushed into accepting their claims – keep them waiting even if that means calling the company they say they work for to check.  And once you have let the caller in, never leave them alone while you go into a different room. Thieves often work in pairs so don’t open the front door to a stranger without locking your back door first.

Keep doors and windows locked
Invest in good door and window locks. Check all locks before leaving the house and keep front and back doors and accessible windows locked to outsiders even when you are in.
It may sound extreme, but the Lamplugh Trust advises avoiding opening doors and windows wide even in summer. The Trust insists: “It’s safer to open a lot of windows a little way (and locking them to prevent them being opened further) than it is to open one or two windows far enough for someone to climb through.”

Pretend you’re in when you’re not
If you’re out, try to make your house look like someone is in. That means cancelling the milk to avoid bottles piling up, asking a neighbour to collect post and leaving a light on or installing an automatic light on/light off system – and even a system that switches radios on and off. Other tips from the Metropolitan Police include: encourage a neighbour to park on your drive, draw the curtains if you will be out after dark and install a burglar alarm or a dummy alarm box as a deterrent.

Keep hedges trimmed
Along with security lighting it is a good idea to keep hedges and bushes trimmed to allow clear views and avoid having places where someone could hide. But it is also advisable to have a secure boundary around your back garden, which is high or awkward enough to make scaling it difficult.

Get crunchy gravel

Crunchy gravel on driveways and paths will make any approach noisier – a useful warning for householders and a deterrent for intruders.
 
Check in with friends and family
If you live alone, try to ensure someone always knows where you are and that you are OK. Even a quick text to let a friend know you’re home and safe after a night out is enough.

Don’t get comfortable in your own street
Stay alert when approaching your home, until you are safely indoors. Have your keys to hand so you are not fumbling on the doorstep and think of safe places you could go if you felt threatened, whether that be a shop, friend’s house or a pub.

Carry a personal safety alarm
These devices, costing as little as £5, can shock or disorientate an attacker, giving you vital seconds to get away. Pick one with the shrillest, loudest siren possible.

Don’t  shout about it
Avoid broadcasting – whether on sites such as Facebook or when you’re out or at work – that you live alone or will be alone in the house at a certain time. Similarly, don’t boast about your upcoming holidays to anyone you don’t know well.

Keep keys hidden
Never leave a spare key concealed anywhere near the front door – as the Met Police note: “Burglars know all the hiding places.” Also never store keys near the front door to avoid letterbox burglaries, and never label your house keys in case you lose them.

IRELAND: www.garda.ie

Mexico City: Vicious Drug Gangs Competing For ‘Cartel Cred’

9 Oct

Alfredo Carmona alias “el Capi,” leader of the New Generation gang, right, is escorted …
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Masked gunmen dump the bodies of 35 slaying victims during rush hour as terrified motorists watch and tweet friends to avoid the avenue in a Gulf coast city. A couple of weeks later, 32 more corpses are found nearby in three houses.

A woman’s decapitated body is left at a border city’s monument to Columbus, the head atop a computer keyboard with a sign saying she was killed for blogging about drug traffickers.

The severed heads of five men are dumped outside an elementary school in Acapulco, and two more near a military base in Mexico City days later.

That was just in the last three weeks.

The brutal public killings that began about five years ago have worsened as Mexican drug cartels try to one-up each other in their quest to scare off rivals, authorities and would-be informers — and still stun Mexicans increasingly numbed to the gory spectacles.

“These gangs have to keep escalating because they want the shock value but the shock value wears off,” said Clark McCauley, a psychology professor at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania and an expert on terrorism. “Now, to get a headline you have to get more heads, or more bodies or do something more horrific.”

Latin American drug lords have long turned to grisly killings and torture tactics. At the height of its powers in the 1990s, the Juarez cartel used to cut off the fingers of snitches and shove them down their throats, a practice that other cartels soon followed.

The current show of savagery began in April 2006 when two police officers were decapitated; their heads dripping blood were left in the resort city of Acapulco, where four alleged members of the Zetas drug cartel had been killed in a shootout with police. Along with the heads was a sign that warned, “So that you learn to respect.”

The Zetas are a gang of drug smugglers and hit men led by deserters from an elite Mexican army unit, who for many years were assassins for the Gulf cartel.

Five months later, the La Familia cartel rolled five human heads purportedly belonging to Zetas across a dance floor in the western state of Michoacan. An attached note said La Familia “doesn’t kill for money, doesn’t kill women, doesn’t kill innocents, just those who should die,” an apparent retaliation warning for the particularly violent group.

Since then, drug traffickers have plunged into even more gruesome tactics. They have tied victims to overpasses and shot them to death during rush hour as sickened motorists watched. Some have decapitated people alive and then posted videos of it on the internet.

“In terms of the cruelty, it’s the Zetanisation of the country because the Zetas were the first to introduce these ghastly tactics into Mexico,” said George W. Grayson, a Mexico expert at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, who has written several books about the rapidly expanding drug cartel. The Zetas are the game-changers.

Officials blame a group calling itself the “Zeta Killers” for dumping 35 bodies on a busy boulevard in the Gulf coast city of Veracruz on Sept. 20. They say the group also killed 32 people whose bodies were found at three houses in the area on Thursday.

On Monday, police in Mexico City found two severed heads on a street near a major military base accompanied by a note referring to the “Mano con Ojos,” or “Hand with Eyes,” drug gang. Motorists called the police after spotting one of the heads on the hood of an SUV.

“If you want to have cartel cred,” said Grayson, “you have to show you can carry off any act at any time and go as far as your enemy.”

Public Safety Secretary Genaro Garcia Luna has said Mexican drug traffickers copied the terror tactic from the al-Qaida in Iraq after it posted videos on the internet of the decapitations of Americans. He said the cartels are using al-Qaida’s methods to pressure the government to halt its crackdown against drug traffickers, which has fractured many of the gangs.

Authorities have also said that in 2005, the Zetas began enlisting “Kaibiles,” former members of an elite Guatemalan counterinsurgency unit, to train newly recruited foot soldiers. The Kaibiles were known for massacres during the Guatemalan civil war that ended in the mid-1990s.

Very few of the killings result in arrests or convictions, so the only deterrent is revenge by another cartel.

In the five years since the beheading of the two Acapulco police officers, decapitations have become almost weekly occurrences and a prime terror tactic.

The practice dates back at least 2,000 years, said Dr. Michelle Bonogofsky, an bioarchaeologist who edited two books on the significance of of the human head in different cultures, from skull collection to decapitations.

“One of the worst things you can do to the body, in some instances, is to desecrate or dismember it and historically, this has been used by kings and various other groups to establish control,” Bonogofsky said. “This could be tied to the religious belief that you need your body intact to be resurrected.”

Residents in some cities caught in the bloody turf battles are already adapting to living with violence, said Dr. Oscar Galicia, a psychology professor who specializes in violent behavior at Iberoamerican University in Mexico City.

In the northern city of Monterrey, where the Zetas are fighting the Gulf drug cartel, many people don’t go out at night in certain neighborhoods, they avoid night clubs and bars and have added extra locks to their doors at home.

“What people are doing in Monterrey is adapting,” he said.

More worrisome is that the prolonged violence is creating a sense of helplessness among Mexicans, who are becoming increasingly numb to what’s happening, Galicia said.

“Now if it’s not 20 bodies, it doesn’t get our attention and that’s terrible and really dangerous for our society because we’re becoming as desensitized as the criminals,” he said.

FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2011 file photo, relatives weep after gunmen opened fire on a taxi killing the driver and the passenger in the Pacific resort city of Acapulco, Mexico. The brutal public killings that began about five years ago have worsened as Mexican drug cartels try to one-up each other in their quest to scare off rivals, authorities and would-be informers _ and still shock Mexicans increasingly accustomed to the gory spectacles. (AP Photo/Bernandino Hernandez, File)

FILE – In this Oct. 2, 2011 file photo, relatives weep after gunmen opened fire on …

London: Police Appeal To Public In Hunt For “Dangerous” Most Wanted Men

5 Oct

Murderers, rapists and robbers are among more than a dozen “dangerous” men wanted abroad and thought to be hiding in the UK.

One suspect is wanted for three murders, while two are brothers who police believe raped a young girl.

Another one of the 14 men being hunted as part of Operation Sunfire is said to have cut the throat of his victim with a beer bottle.

Police Hunt 'Dangerous' Men Hiding In UK

Det Sgt Pete Rance, of Scotland Yard’s extradition squad, said: “We are hoping the public’s vigilance can help us trace these men.

“They are dangerous and not to be approached.

 “If you spot them or believe you know where they are living, working or frequenting, then I urge you to call Crimestoppers so we can find and arrest them.

“The countries where these crimes happened want these men back to face justice for these offences and it is in the interests of London to help find them.”

Among those being sought is 41-year-old Ndrieim Sadushi, who is suspected of committing three murders and an attempted murder in Albania in 1997.

Polish brothers Wojciech and Dariusz Glowacki, aged 29 and 33 respectively, are wanted for the rape of a young girl – and are thought to be living in London.

And Adrian Vasilescu, 31, is wanted in Romania for an attack in which he allegedly cut his victim’s throat using a beer bottle.

Police say he may be living in or around the Manor Park area of the capital.

Details and images of all 14 of those wanted can be found at:

 www.crimestoppers-uk.org

 In Ireland: www.garda.ie

 

Mexico City: Gunman’s Shadow In Vigilante Call To Exterminate Vicious Zetas Drug Cartel

27 Sep

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The Mexican government said it is investigating videos posted on the Internet in which a gang of masked men vow to exterminate the violent Zetas drug cartel, and said it opposes such vigilante methods.

At least two videos have been posted by a group believed linked to the powerful Sinaloa cartel that calls itself the “Mata Zetas,” or “Zetas Killers.” The Zetas were founded by deserters from an elite military unit and are known for their brutality.

In the most recent video, posted over the weekend, the group says it is attacking the Zetas because people are tired of the gang’s kidnappings and extortion.

“We are the armed wing of the people, and for the people,” says a man with a ski mask, who is seen in the video sitting at a table with four other masked associates and reading from a prepared statement. “We are anonymous warriors, with faces, but proudly Mexican.” The speaker said his group was prohibited by its ethical code from carrying out kidnappings or extortion.

No group has formally claimed responsibility for that video, but the language and style of the declaration were similar to a video released in July, in which about two dozen armed men claimed to be “Mata Zetas” from the Jalisco Nueva Generacion cartel, or New Generation cartel, a group linked to the Sinaloa cartel.

The Interior Department said in a statement Monday night that the Attorney General’s office “has opened an investigation into the videos that express the aforementioned ideas and are circulating on the Internet.”

“While it is true that the criminal organization known as the Zetas should be defeated, that must occur by legal means and never by methods outside the law,” the statement said.

While Mexican video-sharing sites and blogs frequently feature alleged statements by cartels, the “Mata Zetas” videos are being taken more seriously after a gang dumped 35 bound, seminude, tortured bodies on a busy avenue in front of horrified motorists in the Gulf coast city of Veracruz.

All 35 victims, who included 12 women and two minors, were linked to the Zetas cartel, and the killers were believed to be from the New Generation gang, said an official of the Mexican armed forces who couldn’t be quoted by name for security reasons.

Local media reported that other banners appeared in Veracruz state over the weekend, accusing the Mexican Navy, which has been active in the anti-cartel offensive, of favoring the Sinaloa cartel, and of kidnapping local people.

While the Interior Department statement did mention those banners, it stressed that “any group or organization that operates outside the law and with violence, is being combated through (government) institutions, and without any favoritism.”

However, security expert Edgardo Basucaglia has expressed fears that Mexico might be spiraling into a situation where paramilitary style organizations spring up, taking one side or another in the war between cartels, with the aid, cooperation or tacit tolerance of parts of the police or military forces.

Such a situation occurred in Colombia in the 1980s and 1990s, when officials allowed illegal far-right militias to spring up to fight leftist rebels. Those Colombian militias become deeply involved in killings and drug trafficking.

“In every country that has been studied throughout history, when they have faced this kind of institutional decadence, society has adopted private mechanisms of protection that give rise to paramilitary forces,” Basucaglia wrote in a recent article. “Mexico today finds itself in the initial stage of the situation they went through.”

The Interior Department, which is responsible for domestic security, rejected any vigilante or paramilitary action.

“In Mexico, there is no room for any person, group or organization to violate by word or deed the rule of law, for whatever reason or end,” the statement said. “The federal government rejects any action that would stray from the path of legality.”

Dublin: Vetran Campaigner Launches New Anti-Drugs Blog

26 Sep

A new anti-drugs website was launched in Dublin today by the well known veteran anti-drugs campaigner J. P. Anderson.

Containing almost 7,000 articles, all of the articles published on the previous blog are available on the home page.

Titled: People’s Free Press Ireland: Newsline.

The new look blog is to be found at:

 

https://drugsinfonewslineireland.wordpress.com/

It replaces http/lostchildreninthewilderness, which had received 255,000 views over the past 12 months

Editor Saying Thank You People For 255,000 Views Over The Past Year

25 Sep

On September 28th 2010 this blog switched from My Space to WORDPRESS.com.

Within that 12 month period readers have viewed the blog a total of 255,000 times.

As editor I want to say “THANK YOU PEOPLE”.

The name and address of the blog has been now changed to:

https://drugsinfonewslineireland.wordpress.com/

J. P. Anderson. Editor: