Galway: Mother Jailed For Eight Years For Vicious & Terrible Crulety & Neglect Of Eight Of Her Children: UPDATED

14 Jul

A mother has been sentenced to 24 years in prison, with the final 16 years suspended, for the cruelty and neglect of eight of her children.

Galway - Mother was jailed this afternoon

Galway – Mother was jailed this afternoon
 
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Six One News: Mother jailed for neglect of children

Six One News: Mother jailed for neglect of children

 
At Galway Circuit Criminal Court, a 47-year-old mother has been sentenced to 24 years in prison, with the final 16 years suspended, for the cruelty and neglect of eight of her children.

The woman pleaded guilty to eight sample charges of assaulting, ill-treating and neglecting two sons and six daughters over a seven-year period from 2002 to 2009…

At Galway Circuit Criminal Court, a 47-year-old mother has been sentenced to 24 years in prison, with the final 16 years suspended, for the cruelty and neglect of eight of her children.

The woman pleaded guilty to eight sample charges of assaulting, ill-treating and neglecting two sons and six daughters over a seven-year period from 2002 to 2009.

She cannot be named to protect the identity of the children.

Imposing sentence, Judge Raymond Groarke said it was incredible that the abuse could go on for so many years with little or no intervention.

NEWS UPDATE:

A 47-year-old mother has been sentenced to 24 years in prison with the final 16 years suspended for the cruelty and neglect of eight of her children over a seven-year period.

The woman, who cannot be named in order to protect the identity of the children, pleaded guilty before Galway Circuit Criminal Court to eight sample charges of assaulting, ill-treating and neglecting the children in a manner likely to cause unnecessary suffering or injury to their health contrary to Section 246(1) and (2) of the Children’s Act, 2001.

The offences took place at various locations around the country from May, 2002 to June, 2009.

The charges relate to two of the woman’s sons and six of her daughters.

Dete Sgt Kieran McNamara outlined the litany of physical abuse and torture which the woman subjected her young children to.

Imposing sentence, Judge Raymond Groarke said it was incredible that the abuse could go on for so many years in a community with little or no intervention. He said what was described by Sgt McNamara was a life given over to actions of neglect, abuse and torture of the children.

“These children were kept as prisoners by their mother. The girls’ hair was cut and they were not allowed to claim the dole lest they would have financial independence and run away. One child was beaten by the mother so that he would appear handicapped, so financial subvention would be given to the mother.

“Not only were the children treated like slaves, but they were viewed by their mother as economic units and she was able to use the children to the best economic purpose that she could.

“It’s quite impossible to know what the motivation is for this woman. She diverted the greater part of the family income away from the children and she has imposed a life sentence on them,” Judge Groarke said.

He sentenced the woman to three years in prison on each charge to run consecutively. He suspended the final 16 years of the 24-year sentence, stating there was no need to impose conditions as he believed the woman could no longer harm her children on her release.

NEWS UPDATE:

A 47-year-old woman, who pleaded guilty to the neglect and cruelty of her eight children, has been jailed for eight years.The abuse took place between 2002 and 2009 at various locations around the country.Galway Circuit Criminal Court heard how eight of the woman’s children – six girls and two boys – were beaten with hammers, frying pans, whips, sticks, vice grips and also her bare hands.Judge Raymond Groarke described the case as a “human tragedy” and a “monstrosity”.He then jailed her for eight years, which he backdated to December 2009 when she was first taken into custody.NEWS UPDATE:

A MOTHER will spend the next eight years in prison after a catalogue of shocking violence against eight of her children, which included regularly attaching vice grips to her children’s faces as punishment.

After hearing details of the litany of violence inflicted by the 47-year-old woman over a seven-year period, Judge Raymond Groarke expressed concern that such abuse could go on for so long with little or no intervention.

In harrowing testimony, Galway Circuit Court was told how the woman:

nStood by as her 14-year-old daughter was stabbed through the arm and then helped stitch the wound at home with an ordinary needle and thread without anaesthetic so the girl could not make a complaint to authorities.

nStood by when the same girl was tied to a tree and whipped until she was nearly dead.

nTied one of her daughters to a horse and then whipped both the child and the horse so it would bolt.

nAttached vice grips to her children’s noses, ears and lips to punish them.

nHit her daughter over the head with a hammer and then dipped her in a river to clean the wound.

The court was also told the woman even beat one of her sons with whips and sticks in a bid to make him look disabled so that she could claim extra social welfare benefits.

The court was told that as well as the violence, there were repeated and persistent episodes of neglect.

One daughter told gardaí how their mother would lock them all in a confined space with no food and give them a wet sheet to sleep on for the night. One of the children recalled how their mother often went away for a week at a time and they would have to beg food from neighbours.

The second-youngest daughter, who was born with physical disabilities, was found strapped into a filthy buggy by a social worker in 2002. The room in which she was discovered by authorities was filthy and cold and there were nappies strewn everywhere. A social worker advised the mother to bring the child, who had breathing difficulties, for treatment to a local hospital but she never did so.

Gardaí said the woman had complete control over the family’s finances and channelled all money received for the children into post office and credit union accounts for herself, while depriving her children of food and clothing.

In victim impact statements read to the court, one daughter said of her mother: “She was not a mother to me. She was an evil bitch.”

The woman’s defence counsel confirmed his client had no psychiatric or psychological problems but said she had a serious alcohol addiction for many years.

NEWS UPDATE:  – AN EVIL BITCH:

A 47-YEAR-OLD mother has been sentenced to 24 years in prison with the final 16 years suspended for the cruelty and neglect of eight of her children over a seven-year period.

The woman, who cannot be named in order to protect the identity of the children, pleaded guilty before Galway Circuit Criminal Court to eight sample charges of assaulting, ill-treating and neglecting the children from May 2002 to June 2009.

The charges relate to two of the woman’s sons and six of her daughters.

In victim impact statements read to the court, one daughter said of her mother: “She was not a mother to me. She was an evil bitch.”

The mother has consistently denied neglecting or abusing her children. She told gardaí she was never influenced by her husband and was not afraid of him.

A Garda Sergeant said she had complete control over the family’s finances and channelled all money received for the children into Post Office and Credit Union accounts for herself, while depriving her children of food and clothing.

Reports from care workers handed into court stated all of the children were infested with head lice when taken into care. They had very little clothing, wore no underwear and didn’t know how to wear underwear when given some by carers. They ate continually when first taken into care and didn’t know the names of basic fruit and vegetables.

Most of them could not read or write as their mother had often refused to send them to school. The mother would not allow her daughters as they got older to draw the dole in case they would have money to run away from home.

Bernard Madden, defending, said the HSE had knowledge of the family since 2000. He said the mother had a very serious alcohol addiction for many years.
Mr Madden confirmed his client had no psychiatric or psychological problems but a forensic psychologist had found she had been sexually abused when 13. The woman denied this.

Victim impact statements from some of the children showed that they are all angry and traumatised at being separated from each other. All are now living in various care and foster homes and are clearly unhappy.

Imposing sentence, Judge Raymond Groarke said it was incredible that the abuse could go on for so many years in a community with little or no intervention. He said what was described by gardaí was a life given over to actions of neglect, abuse and torture of the children.

He noted the children were treated like slaves by their mother.

“What is it that can make a mother behave as this lady behaved? Was it because she was sexually abused as a child, which I doubt is not the case, or was it because she was an alcoholic from an early age? That might give some insight into the situation but this lady has little if any notion of remorse for what she has done.”

NEWS UPDATE:

DETECTIVE Sergeant Kieran McNamara outlined the litany of physical abuse and torture to which the woman subjected her young children.

In 2002, she stood by as her 14-year-old daughter was stabbed through the arm and then helped stitch the wound at home with an ordinary needle and thread so that the girl, who was regularly beaten and tortured along with her seven siblings, could not make a complaint to the authorities. The mother refused to take her daughter to a doctor when the wound and stitches became infected and burst open days later.

A doctor who examined the girl’s right arm in 2009, when some of the children were taken into care, “cringed” at the thought that the child was stitched without anaesthetic, Sgt McNamara said.

The mother was present when the same girl was tied to a tree and whipped until she was nearly dead. The mother had a good laugh at her as she untied her later. The same girl was hit over the head on another occasion with a hammer and then dipped in a river to clean the wound. Her mother regularly locked a vice grips to her nose, ears or lips for an hour at a time to punish her.

She was regularly beaten with a length of piping with screws attached to one end and her head was shaved by her mother to stop her running away from home. Her mother often bit her on the face and hit her over the head with anything she could get her hands on — bottles, hammers, sticks and blocks. On one occasion the mother tied this daughter to a horse and then whipped both the child and the horse so that it would bolt.

In statements given to gardaí following the mother’s arrest on Christmas Eve, 2009, the other children outlined how their mother regularly attached vice grips to their noses, ears and lips to punish them. One daughter said her mother would use a vice grips to grab her ear and pull and twist it until it bled.

Another daughter told gardaí how their mother would lock them all in a confined space with no food and give them a wet sheet to sleep on for the night. One daughter recalled how their mother often went away for a week at a time and they would have to beg food from neighbours.

Three of the siblings recalled that when an older brother and sister managed to run away from home, they were subjected to terrible beatings with a whip from their mother.

She beat one of her sons very badly with whips and sticks in a bid to make him look disabled so that she could claim extra social welfare benefits for him.

NEWS UPDATE:

THE HSE has ordered an investigation into how social services failed to intervene in what a judge described as the “torture” of eight children by their mother over seven years.

The move has once again highlighted ongoing shortcomings with child protection legislation and came on the same day that revised child protection guidelines were published by the Department of Children.

The HSE review into social workers’ involvement with the family, who cannot be named to protect the children, will look at why eight siblings were only taken into care nine years after social workers first became aware of dysfunctional behaviour within the family.

Details of the abuse, which emerged this week, have revealed a catalogue of abuse carried out by a 47-year-old mother against eight of her children.

The abuse included beating one of her sons with whips and sticks in a bid to make him appear disabled so that she could claim extra social welfare benefits.

The children were only taken into care in 2009, despite the HSE admitting it was aware of the family in 2000.

The handling of the case has been referred to the HSE’s national review group for serious incidents and child deaths.

The group, which has an independent panel made up of professionals from a range of disciplines, is assessing the HSE’s involvement with the family, and should complete its assessment within four months. The HSE must publish the executive summary of the report at the very least, or the entire report within 30 days of completion.

News of the investigation came on the same day that the Government moved to tighten rules on reporting and identifying the abuse of children.

The Children First guidelines set out the responsibility of agencies working with children.

The guidelines, first published in 1999, also refer to how children can be abused through online activity and social networking sites.

Laws will be introduced in the autumn to enforce the protection guidelines.

HSE national director for Children and Family Services Gordon Jeyes yesterday stressed the importance of accountability, consistency and transparency in the child welfare and protection system.

He said the absence of these foundations has been proven, time and again, to have placed children at serious risk.

Responding to news of the HSE investigation, Mary Flaherty of abuse support group CARI said report after report has demonstrated the gaps in a system that allow adults to shirk their responsibilities to protect children.

Ms Flaherty said the publication of the guidelines gave renewed vigour to the reform process within the child welfare and protection system.

But she said this is just the start of the process.

“In addition to the enactment of Children First legislation, the long-awaited National Vetting Bureau Bill must be progressed as a matter of urgency,” she said.

“It is also crucial that we do not forget the fundamental lack of children’s rights at the highest level of Irish law. The constitutional referendum on children’s rights must provide the backbone to reform of our child protection system by asserting the primacy of protecting children and promoting their rights in the Irish Constitution.”

On Thursday, the woman at the centre of the case pleaded guilty to eight sample charges of assaulting, ill-treating and neglecting eight children from May 2002 to June 2009.

One daughter told gardaí their mother would lock them all in a confined space with no food and give them a wet sheet to sleep on for the night. One child recalled how their mother often went away for a week at a time and they would have to beg food from neighbours.

In 2002, a social worker found the second-youngest daughter, who was born with physical disabilities, strapped into a filthy buggy. The room in which she was discovered by authorities was dirty, cold and strewn with nappies.

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One Response to “Galway: Mother Jailed For Eight Years For Vicious & Terrible Crulety & Neglect Of Eight Of Her Children: UPDATED”

  1. marie 1JulyJ2011 at 1:02 pm #

    i am aghast by the horrors that some people inflict on children and recieve such little sentences for the crimes they commit. the failures yet again of the HSE not intervening early enough has allowed the suffering of these children to go on for longer than needed. how long can the government hold off the childrens referendum and change the wording to the constitution so children are protected after all they are our future but what a bleak future it will be as i doubt this will be the last case like this that we will hear about. protecting children and keeping them safe should not have a price on it the government needs to open its eyes and start putting funding into what matters.

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